REGISTER | LOGIN
Loading
    
  

READING LIST

APRIL 2016 ISSUE


'Our Vision is that in The Years to Come we Should be Able to Export Products Developed And Produced in India to Our Customers Worldwide'
Chief Executive Officer, Safran India, Stephen Lauret
 

Ghazala Wahab

For a company that has been operating in India for nearly six decades, making, as well as exporting from the country, the government of India’s clarion call of ‘Make in India’ rightly induces a sense of déjà vu.

Stephen Lauret But chief executive officer, Safran India, Stéphane Lauret is both polite and careful with his words. “‘Make in India’, he says, “is a good concept. We believe in this concept, this is the reason that we have been making in India for decades. Our philosophy has been that if you want to sell in India, you will have to make in India. Hence, the first step towards this is to have a programme in the country.”

While Lauret’s immediate reference is to the economies of scales that can be achieved through indigenous production, Safran’s activities encompass the whole cycle of development, production, training and exports, going well beyond merely making. And this cycle has only grown in size.

In the last 20 years, Safran has exponentially scaled up its presence in the country. Today, it employs more than 2,500 people in India across at least four cities and has posted the annual workforce growth rate of 30 per cent over the last decade. In sheer numbers of employees alone, India is the largest country for Safran in Asia, and the fifth largest in the world. A measure of its activities can be gauged by the fact that it not only runs a 100 per cent export-oriented unit in Bengaluru in collaboration with Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL), which makes components for CFM56 engines and Turbomeca helicopter engines, it also runs a training centre in Hyderabad and an engineering centre in Bengaluru for Indian and regional customers.

Given this, it is indeed surprising that Safran doesn’t have ‘top of the mind’ recall status in India. Forget the lay person, even journalists focussed in this area, do not fully grasp the extent of Safran’s presence in India. For example, 65 per cent of all platforms that fly in India, whether in the military or the civil domain, either are powered by one of the Safran companies, or have one of their equipment, say, landing gear or Inertial Navigation System (INS). More to the point, all helicopters made by HAL have engines co-produced/co-developed with Safran. All three military services of India use Safran-company (Sagem) made INS of the Sigma family; in fact, Sagem has been serving the armed forces of the nation for decades; nearly 800 of which are now in service.

The primary Indian partner for Safran has been HAL, with which it has several agreements. Shown here is the picture of HAL’s advanced light helicopter Dhruv
The primary Indian partner for Safran has been HAL, with which it has several agreements. Shown here is the picture of HAL’s advanced light helicopter Dhruv

 
 
[View Full Story]
Comments(0) Share








 
  © 2016 FORCE ARROWHEAD MEDIA PVT. LTD. All Rights Reserved. Private Area | Old Link Directory | Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions | Sitemap