REGISTER | LOGIN
Loading
    
  

READING LIST

MAY 2016 ISSUE


Rockwell Collins’ strategy to expand in India is threefold: bring the best of our global offerings to India, partner with local companies to customise our offerings, develop capabilities locally through our India engineering design centre and through local strategic partnerships
Sunil Raina, managing director- India, Rockwell Collins
 

Sunil Raina What are your latest offerings in the area of Software Defined Radios (SDR) to India?
Rockwell Collins unveiled our TruNet™ - exportable, programmable, networked communications for enhanced situational awareness - for the first time at DefExpo.

TruNet gives ground and airborne forces the power to network as never before, securely and in real time. Its ground-breaking capability enables seamless interoperability. TruNet enables the secure sharing of critical data, image, voice and video communications across all domains in the battlespace.

Whether forces are operating alone or with joint or coalition elements, they can stay connected and aware, no matter their mission, location or platform.

TruNet’s Airborne, Ground and Handheld series software defined radios (SDRs) are small, light and powerful. And, TruNet enables developers to easily tailor the system – from a few handheld radios to a complete ground-air network – to meet customers’ mission needs.


What is your assessment of the flight simulation market in India? Give us an update on your partnership with Zen Technologies.
We see tremendous opportunity in the flight simulation market in India. We are continuing our close relationship with Zen Technologies to combine and build on the strengths of both companies. We unveiled Rockwell Collins’ newly released EP®8100 image generator in Zen’s booth and further demonstrated the joint systems simulation partnership between Zen and Rockwell Collins.


How do you plan to support government’s ‘Make in India’ policies?
Rockwell Collins’ strategy to expand in India is threefold: bring the best of our global offerings to India, partner with local companies to customise our offerings, develop capabilities locally through our India engineering design centre and through local strategic partnerships. This enables us to align with the ‘Make in India’ policy, contribute jobs, transfer technology and develop capabilities in country for both local use and export.


Rockwell Collins has radios, GPS, EW equipment on various military equipments. Are you also part of their upgrade programmes? Please give us details.
One of the key business areas of Rockwell Collins is leading aircraft upgrades. Yes, we are actively engaged with various agencies like the Indian Navy and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) for several such opportunities.


From the foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEM) perspective, what more should the government do to ensure there is a favourable environment in India for defence manufacturing?
The government’s Defence Procurement Policy (DPP) gives a significant impetus to indigenisation and makes the Indian defence market more lucrative to both domestic and international players. It also stresses reducing delays in procurements by eliminating repetitive procedures. Overall the policy is a forward looking one and is likely to usher in faster defence procurement with greater participation of domestic companies. The policy aligns with Rockwell Collins’ strategy and we are hopeful it will help expedite new projects and procurements going forward. With the government seeking more FDI and participation of foreign OEMs as technology partners, interaction between the ministry of defence (MoD) and Indian representatives of foreign OEMs also should be made easier. More frequent interaction will also lead to efficient solutions for Indian MoD.

 
 
[View Full Story]
Comments(0) Share








 
  © 2016 FORCE ARROWHEAD MEDIA PVT. LTD. All Rights Reserved. Force Blog | Old Link Directory | News you can use | Sitemap