China’s BRI has been recognised globally as contributing to improve global governance
 
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For Common Good

China’s BRI has been recognised globally as contributing to improve global governance

Li Xia
 

On 17 March 2017, the 15 members of the UN Security Council included the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and the concept of building ‘a community of shared future for all humankind’ into a resolution for the first time, signifying that China’s contributions to improving global governance have been widely recognised by the international community.

Looking back at human history, especially Europe’s history of geopolitics and international relations, it is easy to see mankind has frequently chosen less-than-ideal paths and implemented many dangerous ideas. Considered by many the ‘father of the modern nation-state’, Cardinal Richelieu, France’s prime minister between 1624 and 1642, was the first political figure to introduce the concept of ‘raison d’état’, a political theory that holds that the interests and needs of the state can take precedence over traditional moral and international law. Richelieu aimed to place a check on the dominance of Europe by the House of Habsburg, but the concept kindled French ambition to rule the European continent. After Richelieu, the focus of international politics shifted from morality to power. The concept of ‘raison d’état’ became a guiding principle of European diplomacy after the signing of the Peace of Westphalia at the end of the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648). To prevent major powers from maintaining hegemonic influence over smaller countries, the ‘equilibrium’ theory was invented, but it has never lead to ultimate peace. Later, French Emperor Napoleon III and German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck advocated the ‘Realpolitik’ diplomatic thought featuring the pursuit of power, imposing an even greater threat to peace. After World War II, two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, vied for supremacy, resulting in the Cold War. The United States became the sole superpower when the Cold War ended, but the wars have not ceased.

The economic globalisation that began in the Eighties triggered the miracle of the Four Asian Tigers, namely, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, as well as the rise of many emerging economies including China as a whole. The 2008 international financial crisis dragged both developed countries and emerging economies into recession. The wealth gap widened, far-rightist forces surged and economic populism gained steam. Turbulence in the Middle East has fuelled terrorism, making it a great threat to safety in the 21st century.

Russian President Vladimir Putin with the Chinese President Xi Jinping at the BRI forum
Russian President Vladimir Putin with the Chinese President Xi Jinping at the BRI forum

 
 
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